Clark’s Story

Download the Video Teaching Guide PDF/Word

MAIN TOPIC OF VIDEO:  How can we understand and then help reverse Global Warming? 

 

Play Picture

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

Frame:

  1. When you feel cold, you put on another layer of clothing. Why does that make you warmer?
  2. What do you know about global warming?
  3. In the video we’ll see a connection between people today and people about 100 years ago. How is our life today different than 100 years ago? What do we have today that they didn’t have?

Focus:

  1. The narrator is sharing his personal family history to talk about global climate changes.  Watch the video to see if this is an effective way to talk about a serious problem.
  2. How is putting on a coat like adding greenhouse gases to our atmosphere?
  3. What are the two main greenhouse gases?
  4. Why is the Keeling curve important?
  5. While you’re watching the video, focus on the relationship between increased CO2 and the increase in global average temperatures.

Follow-up:

  1. What are some actions that people can take to reduce greenhouse gas emissions?
  2. What can governments do to reduce greenhouse gas emissions?
  3. What else do you want to learn about global warming? Where can you find that information?
  4. Why do some people still doubt that there is global warming and that it has been caused by human activity? How could you convince them with facts? (More advanced)
  5. What are the current levels of carbon dioxide?
  • There are additional resources at the end of this video guide that lead students to use other on-line resources to examine global warming in more detail.

 

ANSWERS TO DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

Frame:

  1. When you feel cold, you put on another layer of clothing. Why does that make you warmer?
    • Student answers may include: it makes me warmer.
    • Actually, your body produces heat, and the extra layer of material keeps the warmed air closer to your body.
  2. What do you know about global warming?
    1. First, it’s important to know the difference between “climate” and “weather”
      • Variations in weather do not mean global warming. As the EPA says:
      • Climate helps you decide what clothes to buy, and weather helps you decide what clothes to wear each day.
    2. The EPA (Environmental Protection Agency” has an excellent website for students at:
  • BIG IDEA: Variations in weather do not mean global warming. 

Climate refers to the average weather conditions in a certain place over many years. For example, the climate in Minnesota is cold and snowy in the winter, and the climate in Honolulu, Hawaii, is warm and humid all year long. The climate in one area, like the Midwest or Hawaii, is called a regional climate. The average climate around the world is called global climate.

When scientists talk about global climate change, they’re talking about the global climate and a pattern of change that’s happening over many years. One of the most important trends that scientists look at is the average temperature of the Earth, which has been increasing for many years. This is called global warming. 

Rising global temperatures lead to other changes around the world, such as stronger hurricanes, melting glaciers, and the loss of wildlife habitats. That’s because the Earth’s air, water, and land are all related to one another and to the climate. This means a change in one place can lead to other changes somewhere else. For example, when air temperatures rise, the oceans absorb more heat from the atmosphere and become warmer. Warmer oceans, in turn, can cause stronger storms.

3.  In the video we’ll see a connection between people today and people about 100 years ago. How is our life different today than 100 years ago? What do we have today that they didn’t have?

  • Answers can include:
    • Cell phones, computers, central heat, internet, jets, fast cars, washing machines, television…basically all the modern conveniences that make life easier and more enjoyable today, but use a lot of energy
    •  All these use a lot of energy and are advanced technology. In the “old” days, people did not have as many things because transportation was slower. Food was limited to what was grown locally. You couldn’t travel easily by car or plane. People took trains or even rode horses…

For more information before or after the video: Energy sources have changed throughout the history of the United States

If students want more information about inventions, here is one resource:

https://www.explainthatstuff.com/timeline.html

There are many resources to help students understand the growth of fossil fuels to support our technological advances. Here is one visual that might be helpful to discuss. Notice that fossil fuels continue to be the main supplier of energy in the United States.

CS_Energy Cons

Energy Kids – General Resources to teach younger students about energy

History of Energy – Resources for younger students to research different timelines and uses for various energy sources. 

Focus:

  1. The narrator is sharing his personal family history to talk about global climate changes.  Watch the video to see if this is an effective way to talk about a serious problem.

Possible discussion ideas: Give students time to think, then pair-share, then share out with the class.

Answers may include:

  • Making it more personal makes it more real
  • My own family has a history that changed because of the climate
  • There are a lot of problems that affect us. It’s good to think about real people being affected.
  • It’s our job to help correct global warming, like the last frame—we all need to join together and work together

2.  How is putting on a coat like adding greenhouse gases to our atmosphere?

  • As the video illustrated, we keep warmer when we add layers that hold in body heat.
  • Greenhouse gases hold in atmospheric heat, so our Earth’s surface, atmosphere, and ocean are getting warmer.

3.  What are the two main greenhouse gases?

  • Carbon Dioxide – CO2
  • Sulfur Dioxide—SO2
  • There are many other greenhouse gases that hold in more heat:

EPA Greenhouse Gases information—this includes personal calculators
-EPA for younger students

4.  Why is the Keeling curve important?

  • It forms the basis for scientists to track levels of carbon dioxide

Earth System Monitoring – NOAA

5.  While you’re watching the video, focus on the relationship between increased CO2 and the increase in global average temperatures.

  • The higher the level of CO2, the higher the increase in temperatures  -or—
  • The Earth has become warmer as the level of carbon dioxide rises.

Follow-up:

  1. What are some actions that people can take to reduce greenhouse gas emissions?
  • Discussion Suggestions:
  • There are excellent ideas in the Green Ninja videos.
  • Watch them as a class, or assign students to individual videos to present practical ideas to the class
  • Take a Green Ninja Pledge
  • As a class, in small groups, or individual students, research other ideas from a variety of resources. A small selection of resources other than the Green Ninja:

What You Can Do

Suggestions on how to cut back energy use at home, at work, etc. – Share at home?

2.  What can governments do to reduce greenhouse gas emissions?

-Governments can set standards for companies to generate fewer greenhouse gases

-Governments can work with scientists to find ways to cut down on emissions

-Governments could make citizens use fewer resources by putting a tax on extra use

3.  What else do you want to learn about global warming? Where can you find that information?

4.  (Advanced Topics) Why do some people still doubt that there is global warming and that it has been caused by human activity? How could you convince them with facts?

5.  What are the current levels of carbon dioxide?

 

ADDITIONAL NOTES AND RESOURCES

Alternate Viewing Guide

  1. What two chemicals are responsible for the greenhouse effect?
  1.  Why do we need greenhouse gases?
  1. Please fill in the following table as you watch the video:

Year

CO2 Concentration (ppm)

Average Global Temperature Increase Influences

1860

283

Farming

1908

Coal

1959

Oil, machinery

2011

Technological advances

2100??

4.  What happened in 1866 and why was this important for human society?

5.  Temperature had risen by ____________in 1908.

6.  As our planet warms, how is life on earth affected?  List 4 more examples that have been studied in class or you have found using resources, such as Climate and Biosphere Exploratorium

  • Polar Bear habitat diminishes and the polar bear could go extinct.
  • ___________________________________________________________
  • ___________________________________________________________
  • ___________________________________________________________

Congressional Temperature Trends

Go to the following website: temperaturetrends.org

Find the graphs titled Global Mean Temperature and Ocean Heat Content at the bottom of the main page and answer the questions below.

Part I:  Reading the Global Graphs

CS_Gloabl Mean Temp

 

  1. What years does this graph show? From __________________ to ___________________.
  2. What does each data point represent?
  3. What does the black line between data points represent?
  4. What is the general trend (shape) of the graph?
  5. What kind of average is a “Mean” temperature?
  6. What temperature was recorded for the year 1880? And for the year 1980?
  7. Did the global mean temperature go up (warmer) or down (cooler)?
    • By how much?

 

Blue and Red Trend Lines

The blue line represents the trend from ______________ to ______________, which is ____________________ per 100 years. (Look at the comment in blue letters.)

The red line represents the trend from ______________ to ______________, which PROJECTS a rise of___________ per 100 years. (Look at the comment in red letters.)

What conclusion can you make from this data?

The __________(red/blue) line is rising steeper than the _________ (red/blue) line. This means that the global mean temperature has been rising____________(faster/slower).

CS_Ocean temp

What does each black data point represent? __________________

What does the black line show? _________________________

What does the green line show? ____________________________

What conclusion can you make from this graph?

The Ocean Heat Content graph shows that the average amount of heat held in the ocean has been ___________________(rising/falling) over the past 50+ years.

Explanation:

Earth stays warm due to greenhouse gases, which keep some heat energy from the Sun. The ocean naturally absorbs about 90% of this heat energy, but the amount it is absorbing is increasing quickly. This means that global warming is increasing.  Watch this movie to learn more. Oceans Absorb Heat

 

Part II:  Interpreting Graphs in Your Congressional District

  • YOUR STATE

From the main page, click on your state and record the temperature trends.

(Find the trends at the bottom left and right of the chart.)

 

What is the rate of warming since 1895?___________________________________

What is the rate of warming since 1960?___________________________________

 

  • MAKING COMPARISONS

Next, fill in this table with information from the website:

  1. Your congressional district*
  2. Another second district in your state
  3. A third district in your state
  4. Your state
  5. Congressional district in another state
  6. United States
  7. World

 

Location of data

Degrees Changed Since 1895

Rate of Warming Since 1895

Degrees Changed Since 1960

Rate of Warming Since 1960

1 *Your Congressional District #______
2 Congressional District #______( in your state)
3 Congressional District #______( in your state)
4 Your state:_______________
5 Congressional District #______( in ANOTHER state)
6 United States
7 World

*If there is no data available for your district, choose one that is close to yours that has data.

 Using the data above, compare the rates of warming.

1.  Is your congressional district warming at a faster rate than the two other districts? (Compare data on lines 1, 2, and 3)___________________________________

2.  Is your state warming at a faster rate the US?  _________________________

3.  Is your state warming at a faster rate than the world?  __________________________

Explore other congressional districts and states around the country and look for the following:

  1.  The temperature increase that is the highest since 1960_____________________________
  2.  The temperature increase that is the highest since 1895_____________________________
  3. A district with a negative (cooling) temperature trend______________________________
  4. The state with the highest temperature change since 1960___________________________
  5. The state with the highest temperature change since 1895___________________________

Compare your district with state and national trends. Then explain, in your own words, why the temperature is rising in your congressional district.

 

Congressional Temperature Trends

Go to the following website: temperaturetrends.org

Sulfate Aerosols

When you compared the temperature trends of your congressional district to those of the globe, you were given a short movie that describes sulfate aerosols (it is linked as sulfate.mov). Or you may watch it through YouTube: YouTube Sulfate Aerosols Watch that movie in its entirety and answer the questions below.  You may need to watch it more than once to answer the questions.

  1.  What is the relationship between CO2 emissions and economic activity?
  2.  The video states that CO2 emissions increased during the 1960’s.  Based on the Keeling plot below, by how much did CO2 increase from 1960-1970? CS_AtmosphericCarbDio
  3. How are sulfate aerosols created?
  4. What do sulfate aerosols do to our planet? Our lungs?
  5. What were the events that led to the British Clean Air Act of 1956?
  6.  Who signed the US Clean Air Act into law in 1970?
  7. After these acts were signed, what happened to global sulfate emissions and to temperature trends?

CS_Ocean heat cont

When you compared the temperature trends of your congressional district to those of the globe, you were given a short movie that describes total heat in the ocean (it is linked as ocean.mov).  Or you may watch it on YouTube: Oceans Watch that movie in its entirety and answer the questions below.  You may need to watch it more than once to answer the questions.

  1.  How much of the trapped heat goes to the atmosphere?  The oceans?
  2.  What happens to the ocean heat content during the brief periods of atmospheric cooling?
  3.  What does the narrator mean when he says that the “800 pound gorilla is the ocean”?

 

  

Credit: This teacher resource has been adapted from content originally developed by Elizabeth Brooking.

Copyright ©2015 Green Ninja. All Rights Reserved.
SiteLock