Fever Reliever

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Main Topic of Video: The causes of global temperature increase.

 FeverReliever_PlayPicture

DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

Frame:

  1. This video uses puns, a play on words, to add humor to a serious issue.
    • What is a pun?
    • What are some examples?
  2. The video will refer to “global warming.” What is “global warming?”
  3. Who or what do you think is responsible for global warming?

Focus:

  1. Watch and listen for details that show that the Earth has a fever.
  2. Watch and listen for the ways that the Earth shows what is causing the warming.
  3. What does the Earth warn us about?
  4. Watch and listen to who has a solution.
  5. Listen to the different solutions.

Follow-up:

  1. What other solutions are there to reduce the “fever” (global warming)?
  2. How does anthropomorphizing the Earth, having it visit the doctor with a fever, help us see another point of view?
  3. How does using puns emphasize the main point of the video?
  4. What else can you do?

 

ANSWERS TO DISCUSSION QUESTIONS

Frame:

  1. This video uses puns, a play on words, to add humor to a serious issue. What is a pun? What are some examples?
  2. Some examples of puns for “kids”
  3. The video will refer to “global warming.” What is “global warming?”
    • Global warming generally refers to the gradual increase in the average temperature of the Earth’s atmosphere and its oceans, which is believed to be one of the causes for the current climate change.
  4. Who or what do you think is responsible for global warming?
    • Most of the energy we use day to day comes from fossil fuels like oil, and coal. When we use energy, we are directly or indirectly burning fossil fuels, and this process emits carbon dioxide (CO2), a gas that is known for its ability to trap heat. Because humans use a lot of energy to produce a lot of things, such as food, clothes, electronics, etc., the amount of carbon dioxide going into the atmosphere is larger than the amount that the oceans and land (soil and vegetation) can absorb, so the amount of CO2 has been accumulating in the atmosphere. This rise in CO2 is partially responsible for the warming of the planet over the last few decades.

Focus:

  1. Watch and listen for details that show that the Earth has a fever.
    • Temperature monitor
    • He’s in the hospital
  2. Watch and listen for the ways that the Earth shows what is causing his warming.
    • Electricity produced from burning fossil fuels.
    • Automobile traffic. Fossil fuels burned for transportation.
    • Industrial pollution. Fossil fuels used by industry to produce goods.
    • Residential pollution. Residential uses of fossil fuels.
    • Greenhouse gases from livestock and agriculture.
  3. What does the Earth warn us about?
    • Unless the human race starts making some big changes fast, [my] warming is only going to get worse and worse.
  4. Watch and listen to who has a solution.
    • Hugh Man Race says, “We can get the Earth’s temperature down, but it’ll only work if we do it together.”
  5. Listen to the different solutions
    • Work on reducing the use of fossil fuels for transportation.
    • Use renewable energy to produce electricity (wind solar, or hydropower for example)
    • Work on solving problems with how we produce food, treat the soil, use livestock and transport products (reduce the amount of fossil fuels used and the production of methane by livestock). 

Follow-up:

  1. What other solutions are there to reduce the “fever” (global warming)?
    • The Green Ninja gives several solutions that individuals can do to reduce their carbon footprint:
    • Personal consumption:
      • Reduce our consumption of products (fuels, clothing, disposable goods, etc.).
      • Try purchasing used items that can be reused, or good quality items that will last a long time.
      • Recycle products when possible
    • Home and personal energy use:
      • Use the heater and air conditioner less.
      • Set the thermostat a couple of degrees higher than room temperature in the summer while you are away from home and a couple of degrees lower in the winter while you are awake or away from home.
      • Replace incandescent light bulbs with LEDs.
      • Purchase energy-efficient appliances when the time comes for you to replace your existing ones. Look for the “EnergyStar” approval star when selecting the right appliance for you.
  1. How does anthropomorphizing the Earth, having it visit the doctor with a fever, help us see another point of view?
    • Giving human qualities to a non-human object is called anthropomorphizing.
      • “Anthro” means human and “morph” means transforming.
    • When you imagine that the Earth is a feeling, thinking being, it might help you realize that we all need to take care of it.
    • When you talk about a thing or animal as if it were human, you’re anthropomorphizing it. The Easter Bunny is an anthropomorphized rabbit.People anthropomorphize all the time. If you’ve ever seen a dog in a sweater, that’s a small case of an owner anthropomorphizing his pet. A cartoon dog who talks is a bigger case of anthropomorphizing. Shel Silverstein’s book The Giving Tree anthropomorphizes the tree — the tree acts as if it were a person. It may seem kind of bizarre, but treating non-human things as human is a way of imagining another point of view. https://www.vocabulary.com/dictionary/anthropomorphize
    • What other books, stories, and/or movies do you know that use anthropomorphization?
      • Think of almost all cartoons and animated movies. Students should be able to describe the personalities and problems of various characters that are portrayed with human emotions.
  1. How does using puns emphasize the main point of the video?
    • Humor may be an effective way of dealing with a serious, and sometimes overwhelming, subject such as global warming. While documentaries deal directly with these issues, another way to reach a wider audience is to entertain them while you are teaching them.
  1. What else can you do?
    • The NRDC is a good resource for positive actions that individuals can take.
    • From its website www.nrdc.org:
      • The Natural Resources Defense Council works to safeguard the Earth – its people, its plants and animals, and the natural systems on which all life depends.When you shop for new appliances like refrigerators, washers, and dryers, look for products with the government’s Energy Star label; they meet a higher standard for energy efficiency than the minimum federal requirements. When you buy a car, look for one with the highest gas mileage and lowest emissions. You can also reduce your emissions by taking public transportation or carpooling when possible.… tell your representatives that transitioning from dirty fossil fuels to clean power should be a top priority—because it’s vital to building healthy, more secure communities.
    • On a more global level, countries need to agree to change their use of energy:
      • https://www.nrdc.org/stories/global-warming-101
      • Globally, at the United Nations Conference on Climate Change in Paris, 195 countries—including the United States—agreed to pollution-cutting provisions with a goal of preventing the average global temperature from rising more than 1.5 degrees Celsius above preindustrial times. (Scientists say we must stay below a two-degree increase to avoid catastrophic climate impacts.)
      • To help make the deal happen, the Obama administration pledged $3 billion to the Green Climate Fund, an international organization dedicated to helping poor countries adopt cleaner energy technologies. Under the terms of the Paris agreement, participating nations will meet every five years, starting in 2020, to revise their plans for cutting CO2 emissions. Beginning in 2023, they will also have to publicly report their progress.

 

FURTHER ACTION

  1. Write your own story, or video, using anthropomorphism to teach an important global problem. Resources are available at http://www.readwritethink.org/classroom-resources/lesson-plans/story-writing-from-object-30917.html
    • Suggestions might include Oceans or the Atmosphere
  2. Draw a cartoon, make a comic, poster, create a website or presentation, etc. to illustrate this video (or another important global problem)
    • Easy-to-use technical resources for students
      • Storify
      • Padlet
      • Google Apps for Education
  3. Quizzes, puzzles:
    • Quizlet
    • Kahoot
  4. Cartooning, drawing
    • Software often changes, but you can always find a student-friendly online comic maker or drawing program through an Internet search.
  5. View other Green Ninja videos and report on different ideas to help reduce the heating of the atmosphere.
  6. Research what other countries are doing to reduce their carbon emissions. Read and report about the most recent climate agreements.
  7. Create a multi-media report or presentation about: What books and movies can you think of that help us deal with difficult subjects?
    • The Lorax
    • The Day After Tomorrow
    • Ice Age
    • Fern Gully
    • Avatar
    • Find popular culture that teaches the public while entertaining them. How appropriate is this approach? Do scientific inaccuracies matter, and if so, how much?

 

 

 

Credit: This teacher resource has been adapted from content originally developed by Elizabeth Brooking.

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